top of page
  • Writer's pictureRichard

Adaptation: The Winners from Human Disturbance

Many species have adapted to human-altered environments and are able to thrive in these areas. Some examples of species that benefit from human environmental disturbance include:


Generalist species: These are species that are able to adapt to a wide variety of environmental conditions and are often found in disturbed areas. Examples include rats, cockroaches, and some bird species such as the European starling.


Invasive species: These are species that are introduced to a new environment and are able to outcompete native species, often as a result of human activities. Examples include kudzu, zebra mussels, and Burmese pythons.


Opportunistic species: These are species that take advantage of resources created by human activities, such as food, shelter, and nesting sites. Examples include some bird species that nest in urban environments, such as pigeons and sparrows.


Pioneer species: These are species that are the first to colonize a disturbed area, such as a recently abandoned construction site or a volcanic island. Examples include lichens, mosses, and some grass species.


Australia, in particular, is a continent that has undergone significant environmental disturbance due to human activities. While many species have been negatively impacted by habitat destruction and other forms of environmental degradation, there are some animal and plant species that have adapted to human-altered environments and are able to thrive in these areas.



One example of an animal species that has benefited from human-altered environments is the common brushtail possum. This nocturnal marsupial is native to Australia and is found throughout the country, including in urban areas. The possum has adapted to living in urban environments by utilizing artificial structures such as roofs, walls, and power poles for shelter and nesting sites. The possum has also become accustomed to feeding on human food waste, including fruit and vegetable scraps and other household leftovers.


Another animal species that has adapted to human-altered environments in Australia is the rainbow lorikeet. This brightly colored parrot is native to Australia and is commonly found in urban and suburban areas, where it feeds on the nectar of flowering plants and trees. The lorikeet has become a popular sight in many urban parks and gardens, and is often considered a pest species due to its habit of feeding on fruit crops.



In addition to animal species, there are also plant species in Australia that have benefited from human-altered environments. One example is the introduced weed species known as the prickly pear cactus. This cactus was introduced to Australia in the 19th century and quickly became a major pest species, infesting large areas of land and causing significant environmental damage. However, in the early 20th century, a biological control program was implemented that utilized a species of moth to control the spread of the cactus. The program was successful, and the prickly pear cactus is now much less of a problem than it once was.



Another plant species that has adapted to human-altered environments in Australia is the jacaranda tree. This tree is native to South America but has been widely planted throughout Australia for its attractive purple flowers. The jacaranda tree has become a cultural icon in many Australian cities, particularly in Sydney and Brisbane, where the trees are known for their beautiful displays of flowers in late spring and early summer.



While some animal and plant species in Australia have benefited from human-altered environments, it's important to note that many more are negatively impacted by habitat destruction, pollution, and other forms of environmental degradation caused by human activities. Therefore, it's important to strive for sustainable development and land management practices that consider the needs of both humans and the environment, to ensure the long-term survival of all species.


Comments


Commenting has been turned off.
bottom of page